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10 Things to do in York York Minster, the National Railway Museum, the Shambles & more!

10 Things to do in York York Minster, the National Railway Museum, the Shambles & more!

Step out of York railway station and you immediately start to experience the city’s history. Opposite the entrance runs part of the longest surviving city walls in Britain. The walls are open to the public daily and still virtually circle the city, walking round provides a free and interesting way of discovering what York has to offer:

Castle Museum

Victorian cobbled streets, old shops and prison cells are part of a six hundred year tour British life. York Castle Museum is a museum of everyday life, displaying thousands of household objects including historic toys, fashion, armour, weapons, tools, printing presses, cooking utensils, farming equipment. Rooms, shops, streets – and even prison cells are recreated and modern sound and lighting effects are used to create a realistic atmosphere.

Clifford’s Tower

Enjoy panoramic views of the city and the surrounding countryside from the top of the tower, built by William the Conqueror to subdue the rebellious north and rebuilt by Henry III in the 13th century

Jorvik Viking Centre

Set on the site where the remains of the City of Jorvik were discovered, the museum recreates life at the end of the first millennium. Viking towns are recreated and over 800 original Viking items, discovered on the site are displayed.

National Railway Museum

Discover the history of the train at the world’s largest Railway Museum. Royal trains, the record breaking Mallard, a replica of Stephenson’s Rocket, and the Japanese Bullet Train are just a few of the exhibits. Admission is free of charge.

Richard III Museum

The exhibition presents the story of Richard III, in the form of a ‘trial’. Visitors give their verdict when Richard is charged with the murders of the Princes in the Tower. Housed in Monk Bar, where the Medieval Gatehouse boasts a rare example of a working portcullis, last lowered in 1953.

River Cruises

Take a trip by boat down the River Ouse, regular trips sail three miles downstream, as far as the Archbishop of York’s residence at Bishopthorpe.

The Shambles

First mentioned in the Domesday Book, The Shambles is a narrow street crammed with gift shops and cafes. The current street, referred to as “Europe’s best preserved medieval street, dates from the Elizabethan period.”, and is so narrow, in places, that it is possible to touch buildings on both sides with outstretched arms.

Treasurer’s House

A medieval town house in the shadow of York Minister, where the ghosts of a Roman legion are said to haunt the cellars. Four centuries of history, including a model ship made from bones, are displayed.

York Minister

York is second only to Canterbury in the Church of England hierarchy and the splendour of the Minster reflects this. Stained glass windows up to 800 years old are found in the largest Medieval Gothic cathedral north of the Alps. Open daily subject to services.

Yorkshire Wheel

See the sights of York from the air, a 60 metre high wheel outside the National Railway Museum offers spectacular views of the city, and surrounding area.

The Railway Museum and The Shambles are free of charge, a York Pass offers free or discounted admission to many attractions in York and the surrounding area. Prices range from £21 for a one day pass to £34 for a three day pass.

York is easily reached by road and rail. Regular direct train services arrive in York from all parts of the country. Parking in York centre is difficult, but well signposted Park and Ride services are available from the outskirts of the city on all major approaches

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